Selected readings and links K-S

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Neurodiversity
Neurodiversity recognises and values the infinite variation in neurocognitive functioning within our species. A strongly emerging neurodiversity movement argues that such differences are just part of our many different ways of being in the world that – rather than needing ‘correction’ or remaining invisible – can richly inform everyday life and ‘normal’ practices.

It is important to recognise that neurodiversity potentially covers a very wide range of different perceptions and experiences. Some autistic people argue that they are not disabled, but that normative society is a disabling context (that can lead to other mental health issues). At the same time, there is increasing self-advocacy related to other neurological variations, such as through Mad Studies.

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Spaces of Cultural Production 

Across the cultural sector, there has been considerable interest in rethinking disability – both in how it is represented and analysed (in exhibition, performance etc.,) and how cultural spaces can be made truly accessible and inclusive.

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Social and Spatial Justice
Disability scholars and activists are increasingly exploring access and inclusion as a collective endeavour; not something to be ‘solved’ by technical design solutions, but as a always contested, partial and dynamic process towards social, spatial and material justice.

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Soundscapes
Poor acoustics can have disabling effects for many different people. Here, though, we want to explore the complexities of soundscapes and how these might be thought of and designed differently, by starting from the experiences of hearing impairment and deafness.

  • Joseph Young (2014) Background Noise: public spaces and unheard conversations. Unpublished piece written for The DisOrdinary Architecture Project. Download it here:Joseph Young – on being a Deaf Artist
  • Susannah B. Mintz (2012) “The Art of Joseph Grigely: Deafness, Conversation, Noise” Journal of Literary & Cultural Disability Studies Liverpool University Press Volume 6, Number 1, pp. 1-16. Download a PDF here.
  • WITHIN/Infinite Ear (2016)
  • LOUD Silence: exhibition catalogue (curated by Amanda Cachia) GCAC, California State University, January – March 2015. Download catalogue here.
  • Amanda Cachia (2015) “Acoustic Algorithms: Dislocating Sound in the Eardrum and Space”. Read online here.

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